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Solutions To Stop Bolts Backing Off 
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Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2008 2:31 pm
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Peter was saying that he uses these on his hubs on his truck:

http://www.stage8.com/

And I've used these on my truck, exhaust manifold, turbo, etc:

http://www.nord-lock.com/default.asp?url=2.16.37

And obviously locktite liquids and friends, and old-school split pins, and so on.

http://www.loctiteproducts.com/products.shtml

What interesting stuff have you used?!

Fred.

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Sat Jul 07, 2012 10:27 pm
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QFP80 - Contributor

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I do not use anything else.

zhaust brakes, brackets.. this is all you will ever want. a few other people make them too..
The brand i use is fabroy.

http://www.bellevillesprings.com/serrat ... shers.html


Mon Jul 09, 2012 7:46 pm
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LQFP144 - On Top Of The Game
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I use copper locking nuts for connecting my downpipe to the turbo. This area is a common failure in my application. I've not had any issues with these. I've also used similar to bolt turbo manifolds to heads with success. The locking is nice, but the copper is the main benefit as it won't bond/rust easily to the stud even at high temp.

I buy them 100 at a time from eBay for cheap. They are usually sold marketed for air-cooled VW applications.

Image

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Wed Jul 18, 2012 7:29 pm
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Getting a wee bit OT but good point re "non stick"; I use stainless nuts over the yellow zinc nordlocks.

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Wed Jul 18, 2012 7:59 pm
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LQFP144 - On Top Of The Game
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Nissan OEM (and other?) solution are these plates:

Image

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Wed Jul 18, 2012 10:41 pm
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Nice, and easy to DIY too!

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n00bs, do NOT PM or email tech questions! Use the forum!
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Wed Jul 18, 2012 11:21 pm
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QFP80 - Contributor
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Location: Se oli ainakin näiiiiiin iso!
BenFenner wrote:
Nissan OEM (and other?) solution are these plates:


I used oval nuts some time ago. Found those while cleaning attic in decades old cardboard box that had matching bolts and nuts. My first thought was that there was mix of inch and metric parts because threads didn't feel like matching, but then I realized that bolts were intentionally sqashed to be oval. No idea where they originally came from, but given nyloc was patented in 1980 wouldn't surprise a bit if some relative of mine bought those before nylocs or other fancy locknuts were widely available.

Quick google search found couple hits on subject. One has similar pattern on edge as on photo you posted. Wonder if those Nissan bolts are also oval?

http://www.lok-mor.com/o-loc.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distorted_thread_locknut


Thu Jul 19, 2012 9:28 pm
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The OEM stainless steel nuts on the exhaust manifold on my mazda engine are triangularly squashed for anti back off ness, IIRC. I feel like I've seen it on other stuff too. Great point! :-)

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FreeEMS dev diary and its comments thread and my turbo truck!
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Fri Jul 20, 2012 12:26 am
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When I was seventeen I had a Honda scooter that the previous
owner had welded the kickstarter to the shaft. That proved to be
quite expensive when I had to have a shop do something or another
inside the side cover.

Eventually the weld failed. Fortunately, the bike was easy to
bump start in second gear. Never did replace it.

These days I have my own welding gear, but I learned my lesson
early on that bike. Fix things properly.

I learned the value of blue Loctite with an old Kawasaki two
stroke that would vibrate parts free, usually resulting in bad
outcomes. Lost a nice set of bullet turn signals that way.
Replaced them with cheesy clearance lights bolted to the license
plate.

I used some random Volvo chassis bolts and ovaled nuts to secure
the toolbox to my work truck bed. I put the nuts inside the box,
on the theory that if someone actually went to the trouble to try
and unbolt the box, the nuts would back off just enough to spin,
and then remain tight. So far, no one has tried to steal my tool
box...

Heh, just read this:
07:14 <@TekniQue> just weld everything

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Wed Jan 30, 2013 6:59 am
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LQFP112 - Up with the play

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Bugger the threads with a small punch right over the nut, ie tweak the first thread. This will create enough resistance to stop any vibration induced nut loss but will allow forcible removal with the nut repairing the threads on the way off. My old mazda MA motor had a thin folded keyed washer that bent over the tightened nut flat, but its only good for about 5 cycles, then it breaks off.


Wed Sep 11, 2013 9:16 pm
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